Umbrella Rides The Wind

Umbrella Rides The Wind

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Umbrella Rides The Wind
30 Jan, 2023
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Umbrella Rides The Wind

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Donegal wreck may have Spanish Armada link

Donegal wreck may have Spanish Armada link

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Spanish armada
Donegal wreck may have Spanish Armada link

TWO SHIPWRECKS discovered off the Donegal coastline may be linked to the late 16th-century Spanish Armada and a separate late 18th-century French armada, despatched to assist Irish rebellion efforts.

However, identification of the two wrecks outside Burtonport harbour may take some time, Connie Kelleher of the Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht’s underwater archaeology unit, said yesterday.

The two shipwrecks, one of which is definitely a warship, are lying 200m apart in just four metres of water off Rutland Island close to Burtonport.

Lead shot balls were retrieved during dives in which Ms Kelleher participated yesterday morning. Pottery has also been recovered from within the hull of the possible Spanish Armada ship, which is filled with sediment.

A full excavation of material is under way, as part of a long-term management plan for the location.

Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht Jimmy Deenihan has awarded €50,000 for the work, and the Geological Survey of Ireland’s vessel Keary, named after late geologist Raymond Keary, is providing a support platform for the dive team.

Many of the wrecks already located lie off the north and west coasts, off Inishowen in Co Donegal; Co Sligo; Clare Island, Co Mayo; Co Galway; and Co Clare; and the Blasket Sound in Kerry.

Five of the hulls, or remains of same, have been located off Donegal, and the three wrecks off Streedagh strand in Sligo were the subject of a protracted court action.

The two wrecks now under investigation were originally pinpointed by Donegal divers, including Liam Miller, Oscar Duffy and Michael Early in 2008-2009. At this stage, identification is uncertain, but Ms Kelleher believes they may be “enormously significant”.

The later wreck, possibly French, could be linked to Napper Tandy’s revolutionary efforts. Tandy (1740-1803), who worked with Wolfe Tone in founding the United Irishmen, accepted a French government offer of a corvette, the Anacreon, and sailed from Dunkirk with United Irishmen and arms, arriving on Arranmore island, close to Burtonport, in September 1798.

However, locals were said to be less than supportive of his aims.

Tandy also learned that Gen Humbert’s expedition had been defeated in Mayo. Nevertheless, he took possession of Rutland, hoisted an Irish flag, and issued a proclamation before leaving and sailing north.

The Geological Survey of Ireland, which is mapping Irish inshore areas as part of the national seabed survey Infomar, will use sidescan sonar and magnetometer equipment in the area to check if there are any other ships.

Mr Deenihan said yesterday that he was “delighted” to be able to support investigations into “a major find of significance not only to Ireland, but also to the international archaeological, historical and maritime communities”.

Mr Deenihan said that if one of the wrecks proves to be from the Spanish Armada, it could constitute one of the most intact on this coast to date and could provide “huge insight into life on board and the reality of the military and naval resources available to the armada campaign”.

He paid tribute to the co-operation of the National Monuments Service and the National Museum of Ireland, which will take responsibility for any artefacts recovered.

SPANISH ARMADA

SOME 24 to 26 Spanish Armada ships are believed to have foundered off the Irish coast in 1588 while en route to invade England under the command of King Philip II.

At least 14 of the sunken ships have been extensively mapped to date.

The total armada fleet of 130 ships, with 29,453 sailors and soldiers on board, comprised 65 warships, 25 transport vessels, four galleys and a number of smaller vessels.

When the fleet was defeated in the English Channel, a scattered fleet opted for the Scottish and Irish west coast route home, but ran into storms. “God breathed and England was saved” was Sir Francis Drake’s later remark about the maritime disaster, which resulted in less than 75 per cent of the fleet making it home.

Source: www.irishtimes.com

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Moby Dick’ captain’s ship found

Moby Dick’ captain’s ship found

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Moby dick
Moby Dick’ captain’s ship found

US marine archaeologists have found the sunken whaling ship belonging to the captain who inspired Herman Melville’s classic 19th Century novel, Moby Dick.

The remains of the vessel, the Two Brothers, were found in shallow waters off Hawaii.

Captain George Pollard was the skipper when the ship hit a coral reef and sank in 1823.

His previous ship, the Essex, had been rammed by a whale and also sank, providing the narrative for the book.
‘Pretty amazing’

The remains of the Two Brothers were found by researchers from America’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Noaa), about 600 miles (965 km) northwest of Honolulu in the remote chain of islands and atolls.

The wooden vessel has disintegrated in the warm waters, but the researchers found harpoons, a hook for stripping whales of their blubber, and cauldrons used to turn whale blubber into oil.

“To find the physical remains of something that seems to have been lost to time is pretty amazing,” said Nathaniel Philbrick, an author, and historian, who has been researching the Two Brothers, the Essex, and their captain.

“It just makes you realize these stories are more than stories. They’re about real lives.”

The sinking of the Two Brothers was relatively uneventful compared with Essex’s run-in with the sperm whale in 1821.

After the Essex sank, Capt Pollard and his crew drifted at sea without food and water for three months and even resorted to cannibalism before they were rescued.

Pollard – who gave up whaling and became a night watchman in Nantucket, Massachusetts – is not thought to have been the basis for the novel’s obsessive Capt Ahab

Source: BBC News

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Umbrella Rides The Wind

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Movie Sanctum

Movie Sanctum

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The Real Sanctum
Movie Sanctum

A film centred around the do-or-die efforts of a group of cave divers.

 

The $30 million-budgeted Sanctum was directed by Alister Grierson and shot in 3-D with the input of co-producer James Cameron, whose previous hits include the 3-D Avatar and Titanic.

The film, which opens on 4 February, follows the trials of a team of cave divers who enter a large, remote cave system in Papua New Guinea.

They struggle with raging currents and an unknown terrain as they try to find a way out of their potential tomb after a tropical storm unleashes floods.

The film is both action thriller and rites-of-passage movie, a centrepiece partnership involving cave divers Frank McGuire (Richard Roxburgh) and his son Josh (Rhys Wakefield).

The cast is fundamentally Australian, exceptions including Welsh actor Ioan Gruffudd who plays the project’s financier.

Sanctum was shot in Queensland, Australia, using a Warner Bros studio with dry-cave sets and a further cave system structure in a flooded tank.

Filming employed 3-D techniques which Cameron used to produce Avatar.

Sanctum‘s co-producer/co-writer Andrew Wight and co-writer John Garvin are both highly experienced divers and trainers in open-circuit, rebreathers and cave diving.

Their experience was invaluable in bringing a sense of diving reality to the film.

The film and Garvin’s contribution to it feature in the February issue of DIVER magazine.

Furthermore, John Garvin will be talking about the making of Sanctum at the London International Dive Show (LIDS 2011) and TEK 2011 conferences, both at the ExCeL Centre on 26/27 March.

Source: http://sanctummovie.com

Map of caves: http://www.nationalgeographic.com

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Umbrella Rides The Wind

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Blog In this essay, sports psychologist and technical diver Matt Jevon draw some parallels between the sport of technical diving and the sport of motorcycle racing, including attitudes and behaviors regarding the inherent dangers and risks, sharing...

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Photographer of the Year 2010 Celebrates the Underwater World

Photographer of the Year 2010 Celebrates the Underwater World

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Photographer of the Year 2010 Celebrates the Underwater World

After months of anticipation, the winners of the Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2010 were announced on 22 October at a gala awards ceremony held at the Natural History Museum, London. Once again Project AWARE supporters did us proud, with fabulous underwater shots in many categories of this renowned, worldwide showcase for the very best photography featuring natural subjects.

Leading the pack was our very own Brian Skerry, one of the patrons of Project AWARE.  He was runner-up in the competition’s brand new Wildlife Photojournalist of the Year award. Launched for the 2010 competition, this award is given to a portfolio of six pictures that tell a memorable and powerful story without the aid of words. His picture sequence The Most Shocking Story of All was shot to help raise awareness of the issues surrounding industrial fisheries – in particular, the methods used to gather fish, and the rapidly dwindling stocks.

The Most Shocking Story Of All by Brian Skerry

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Umbrella Rides The Wind

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Blog Phasellus consequat orci eget ex euismod vulputate at quis lorem. In euismod accumsan tortor, quis dictum ligula lacinia sit amet. Aliquam eget vulputate urna. Integer posuere lobortis elit, ac dignissim elit ullamcorper vitae. Mauris dignissim...

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Why go tech? Motivations behind technical diving

Blog In this essay, sports psychologist and technical diver Matt Jevon draw some parallels between the sport of technical diving and the sport of motorcycle racing, including attitudes and behaviors regarding the inherent dangers and risks, sharing...

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